A trip to Yazd will make you familiar with life in desert towns and how people cope with it. You learn about underground water supplement system (Yariz or qanat) for which Iranians are well-known. The water reservoirs, icehouses, wind catchers and pigeon towers make it worthwhile to have a visit to Yazd and explore the uniqueness of this ancient city of Iran.


Yazd is one of the most well-known desert cities of Iran. Many Iranians and tourists like to visit Yazd to see the beautiful architecture found in desert areas. It is known as the city of tourist attractions like wind catchers, Zoroastrians, Termeh (traditional brocade), silk weaving, baqlava and qotab (local sweets), etc.

A trip to Yazd will make you familiar with life in desert towns and how people cope with it. You learn about underground water supplement system (Yariz or qanat) for which Iranians are well-known. The water reservoirs, icehouses, wind catchers and pigeon towers  make it valuable to have a visit to Yazd and explore the uniqueness of this ancient city of Iran.

Masjid-e Jame: The name of the mosque means the “mosque of friday”. The construction of the mosque back to the fourteenth century. This historical place is well worth a visit. It is an example of finest Persian mosaics and excellent architecture. The minarets of Masjid Jame of Yazd are the highest in Iran. Admire it at night when it is lit up.

Masjid-e Jame

 

Atashkadeh: It is a Zoroastrian fire temple. It is supposed that the fire on the inside has been burning since 470 AD.
Atashkadeh is located on the Ayatullah Kashani Avenue and is 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) away from Yazd Airport (Shahid Sadooghi).
It is said that the highest grade of fire temples were first constructed in the Sasanian Empire for the reverence of fire, which is the manifestation of Ahura Mazda, the God in the Zoroastrian religion.

Atashkadeh

 

Tower of silence: This is the Zoroastrian's crypts. The name “tower” is misleading because these crypts consist of huge circular walls on top of two hills, within those the dead bodies were left to be picked and cleaned by the vultures. This rule has been done in accordance with Zoroastrian belief. However, the towers are not in use anymore and they are open to the public for visiting. A quiet and peaceful place.
To get there using public transport, you can take the bus going south on Imam Khomeini from the bus stop across the street of Amir Chakhmaq Complex. Get down on the last stop, end of the line at an interchange terminal, and then from there, you can ask people for another bus going to "Dakhme" (it is pronounced like German "Dach"). You might need to wait a bit and make sure that the people will tell the bus driver to drop you on the correct bus stop. Once you are off the bus, it's a corner of a 4-way intersection and you go right, you will see the towers. You can reach there in 10 minutes by walking.

Tower of silence

 

Water Museum:  The museum is housed in a former qadjar house. Ideal for understanding the ingenuity of the qanats, irrigation system still at work in Yazd and throughout the country. More than 3,000 canals have been built in the province of Yazd alone, of which about 100 are still active. One of them is located in the basement. Before that, a series of objects make it possible to better understand the work indispensable to the control of the precious water resource by the moghani (the diggers). Note the tools of the diggers, the containers and the model of a cistern. In order to enjoy a little freshness of the place, go also to the sardab, a piece that used to conserve food and fruit at the time. You will end the tour with an overview of the nineteenth century legal documents relating to the ownership of the qanats.

Water Museum

 

Amir Chakhmakh complex:The Amir Chakhmaq is an eminent structure in Yazd, Iran, noted for its symmetrical sunken alcoves. This complex, in which there is a mosque, is located on a square of the same name. It also contains a caravanserai, a tekyeh, a bathhouse, a cold water well, and a confectionery. At night, the building is lit up after sun set with orange lighting in the arched alcovesl; it makes a beautiful spectacle. During the Iran–Iraq War and the Iraq wars with the United States and Afghanistan, many Iraqis and Afghanis have come to inhabit the Amir Chakhmaq Square.

Amir Chakhmakh complex


 

Alexanders prison: Today it is called “Ziaeyeh School”. It was neither built by Alexander the Great nor a prison, but a 15th-century domed school which is quite an interesting sight with a cafe in the 'prison room'.

Alexanders prison


 

Chak Chak: It is a village in Rabatat Rural District, in Ardakan County, Yazd Province.
The village is the most sacred of the mountain shrines of Zoroastrianism. Located near the city of Ardakan in Yazd Province, Chak Chak serves as a pilgrimage point for pious Zoroastrians. Annually, from June 14–18, many thousands of Zoroastrians from Iran, India and other countries flock to the fire temple at Pir-e Sabz.
In Zoroastrian belief, Chak Chak is where Nikbanou, second daughter of the last pre-Islamic Persian ruler, Yazdegerd III of the Sassanid Empire, was cornered by the invading Arab army in 640 CE. Fearing capture Nikbanou prayed to Ahura Mazda to protect her from her enemies. In response to Nikbanou's pleadings, the mountain miraculously opened up and sheltered her from the invaders.

Chak Chak

 

Dowlat Abad Gardens: At the gates of Yazd, the palace of Dowlat-dabad was erected in 1738 by a governor of the city during the reign of Nader-Shah.

In addition to the governor's own residence, the complex comprises a Persian garden (or chahar-bag) and a hexagonal pavilion with two levels dominated by a very high wind tower (or badgir).

Under the tower, the center of the pavilion, occupied by a basin surmounted by a dome, communicates, by bays or claustra with the different rooms of the two levels. The structure of the building allows an efficient refreshment of all the rooms of the pavilion. This square is geographically located at the center of Iran.

Dowlat Abad Gardens