Women have to cover their hair, neck, décolleté, and not to reveal the forms of his body. Ladies, you will need ample clothing (long-sleeved tunics) and a veil that you will have to get before your arrival.


How to dress in Iran
Women have to cover their hair, neck, décolleté, and not to reveal the forms of his body. Ladies, you will need ample clothing (long-sleeved tunics) and a veil that you will have to get before your arrival. Indeed, you will have to carry them as soon as the descent of the plane, even 10 minutes before the landing for the Iranian companies.
Then, it is necessary to cover for women and it is obligatory everywhere, except in the inns when you are informed that you can put yourself at ease. The headscarf this said is worn in a very light way in Iran. The Iranians can see half of the hair and as a tourist you can also let enough fresh air into your hair without shocking. Do not be intimidated by the women wearing the chador, it happens that there is some freedom on how to "cover" in Iran.
For men, nothing special to report except the wearing of shorts in mosques and administrations. That said I did not see many men walking in shorts either in the cities, but rather in the nature.
Islamic law seems to be increasingly flexible, or in any case gives rise to interpretations that give women some liberties. So you can see a lot of Iranian women wear the veil casually backwards so as to make a good part of their hair appear. Bright colors are also not proscribed. Iranian women wear makeup very much and some wear more fitting outfits than others.

A group of tourists in Iran


 
• Couples should show no sign of affection: avoid kisses, braces or even hold hands. The authorities are tolerant with tourists but try to comply with the rules.
• Any physical contact between a man and a woman who is not of the same family is forbidden: bisection is prohibited, and even handshakes, especially in administrative buildings. To greet a man, you can attach your hands to your chest by tilting his head lightly ... A bit like a Namaste to the Indian.
• Buying / drinking alcohol is prohibited.


Watch out for places where you are shooting or filming, especially near administrative or military buildings, you may be accused of espionage. Similarly, avoid questioning Iranians about political issues.


Driving in Iran
The way we drove in Iran is quite disconcerting. Whether you are a driver, passenger or pedestrian, pay attention to you. It is not uncommon to see pedestrians crossing in the middle of a fast lane, a 4 lane quickly turns into a 5 or 6 lane, markings on the ground do not serve much and the use of the turn signal seems optional.
So, driving in Iran calls for special skills to cope with the different habits of driving in the country. Some people call traffic in Iran busy and chaotic, others prefer the term death-defying circus. Nonetheless, self-driving remains a good way of visiting Iran.
Fuel prices, fuel cards and availability
Iran has a card called fuel card which is necessary to buy petrol. Don’t worry, if you don’t have this card, you can get petrol without as well. The word for free (meaning without card) is ‘azad’ in Farsi. The pump attendant will use his own card and sell it to you at the standard price. Very occasionally there are petrol stations which do not have their own card, in which case you can either go and find another, or wait for a driver to come and let you use his card.
Petrol and diesel are incredibly cheap in Iran. Without the fuel card, you will pay a higher price, but it remains cheap.