There are fossils from the lower, middle and upper Paleolithic, as well as from the Neolithic, the Chalcolithic, the beginning and the end of the Bronze Age, and the iron ages I / III, and through the median Achaemenian periods , Seleucid, Parthian and Sassanid.


The 1st Floor - Pre-Islam building
The Pre-Islamic Period and Prehistory


The 1st floor of the National Museum is dedicated to the ... prehistoric period. Less artistically rich since very old.
The rooms show the product of the excavations concerning the period 6,000 to 3,000 BC. The oldest objects on this floor date back to the lower Palaeolithic period. Then we go from this period to the last period of the 4th millennium BC. that is to say up to the time just before the creation of writing in the Iranian plateau.
There are more than 600 exhibits, discovered in prehistoric areas such as Tappeh Sarab in Kermanshah province, Tappen Alikosh in Khuzestan province, Sang-e-Shakhmaq near the town of Shahroud, Tall-e-Bakon in the Fisi province, Susa in Khuzestan province, Sialk Tappeh near the town of Kashan, Tappeh Hesar near the town of Damghan, Tappen Choghamish and Bouhalan in Khuzestan province ...

There are fossils from the lower, middle and upper Paleolithic, as well as from the Neolithic, the Chalcolithic, the beginning and the end of the Bronze Age, and the iron ages I / III, and through the median Achaemenian periods , Seleucid, Parthian and Sassanid.

There are collections from the prehistoric regions of the Caspian Sea, including the pottery of Amlash in the Guilan region, dating from the 2nd millennium BC. Darband, and Ganj Par are sites where testimonies of the Early Paleolithic period were discovered.

In the north-west of Iran

"Ganj Par" is an archaeological site of the lower Palaeolithic of the province of Guilan. It was discovered in 2002 by a team of archaeologists from the Paleolithic Research Center of the National Museum of Iran. Nearly 150 lithic remains of limestone, magmatic rocks and sandstone have been discovered on the surface of an ancient alluvial terrace of the Sefid Rud which flows today to the east of the site. They include bifaces, a peak, carved pebbles and smaller tools on chips. These tools are analogous to the Acheulean Acheulean industries and indicate that Iran is included in the Acheulean extension zone. "

The lower Palaeolithic site of the Darband Cave is to the east of Ganj Par.

We can also see tools made of Neutralian Mousterian stone.

The cave of Yafteh is the most important place where Upper Palaeolithic tools were found, they date back to about 30 000/35 000 years.

Also, old 9,000-year-old human and animal figures from Sarab Hill in Kermanshah province.

Northeastern Iran

In northeastern Iran, the lower Palaeolithic archaeological site of the Kashafrud river basin is found in the province of Razavi Khorasan to Mashad.

"Turang Tappeh" is located in the province of Golestan, about 22 km northeast of Gorgan. It is accessed by road and a dirt track, and access is possible only by a taxi from Gorgan.

It is one of the oldest historical sites in the area first excavated in 1841 by the Iranians and then in 1931 by an American archaeological expedition from the University of Pennsylvania.

There are two other mounds (Shah Tappeh and Tappeh Hissar).

Turang Tappeh was an important regional station for caravans, and was destroyed during the Mongol period, (1220-1380). The excavations reveal five distinct layers, the oldest dating back to the 6th millennium BC and the last dating from the first Arab-Peruvian period.

The relics (lapis lazuli and ceramics) from these mounds and the nearby cemetery include pottery and other objects belonging to the 2nd and 3rd millennia BC. JC.

In the ruins of the ancient city of Jorjan, relics dating from the Islamic period and indicating the extent of this vast historical area at that time were discovered. The most important discoveries are now on display at the National Museum.

Northeastern Iran

In northeastern Iran, the lower Palaeolithic archaeological site of the Kashafrud river basin is found in the province of Razavi Khorasan to Mashad.

"Turang Tappeh" is located in the province of Golestan, about 22 km northeast of Gorgan. It is accessed by road and a dirt track, and access is possible only by a taxi from Gorgan.

It is one of the oldest historical sites in the area first excavated in 1841 by the Iranians and then in 1931 by an American archaeological expedition from the University of Pennsylvania.

There are two other mounds (Shah Tappeh and Tappeh Hissar).

Turang Tappeh was an important regional station for caravans, and was destroyed during the Mongol period, (1220-1380). The excavations reveal five distinct layers, the oldest dating back to the 6th millennium BC and the last dating from the first Arab-Peruvian period.

The relics (lapis lazuli and ceramics) from these mounds and the nearby cemetery include pottery and other objects belonging to the 2nd and 3rd millennia BC. JC.

In the ruins of the ancient city of Jorjan, relics dating from the Islamic period and indicating the extent of this vast historical area at that time were discovered. The most important discoveries are now on display at the National Museum.
"Tappeh Hissar" is one of the most important prehistoric sites of Iran, the ruins dating from the 4th millennium BC. They are located to the southeast of the town of Damghan, 80 km south of the Caspian Sea, near the remains of a Sassanian palace. They attest to the presence of the first Aryan population in the high Iranian plateau.

The town of Damghan was very important in the Middle Ages, being the capital of the province of Qumis (or Qoumes), and being on the route of the Silk Road. It was destroyed in September 1729 by the Afghan incursion (Battle of Damghan).

Some monuments survive the catastrophe like the Zaraastrian temple of Tarikhaneh of Sassanian period, then called Mosque of Tarikhaneh after the conversion of the region to the Islam.

Not far from the city is the site of the ancient Greek city of Hecatompyles (the city with hundred gates) founded after the invasion of Alexander the Great.

Damghan was destroyed on 22 December 856 by an earthquake.