Bastak is a historic city in southern Iran that owes its fame to many caravanserais dating back to the Achaemenid era. Located 170 km west of Bandar Abbas in the province of Hormozgan, Bastak borders the province of Fars in the north and Bandar Lengeh (the port Lengeh) to the south and therefore enjoys a privileged geographical location.


Bastak is a historic city in southern Iran that owes its fame to many caravanserais dating back to the Achaemenid era. Located 170 km west of Bandar Abbas in the province of Hormozgan, Bastak borders the province of Fars in the north and Bandar Lengeh (the port Lengeh) to the south and therefore enjoys a privileged geographical location.

The city is also renowned for its Sufi brotherhoods, established in the region for at least seven centuries. This city gathers diverse ethnic groups, including the Abbaidid sheikhs, Madani, Seyyed, as well as nomads. According to historical data, following the capture of Baghdad by the Mongols in 1258, the Sufis left the city to seek refuge in southern Iran. They settled in particular in Hormozgan and Fars. These Sufis are at the origin of the existence of a good number of religious architectural works, which still strew the province.

The Bastak area, which includes 200 villages, is located on the foothills of two vast mountains in the south of the country: Gabast and Hormozan. The first, Gabast (Pahlavi word meaning "North Pole") stretches from Bastak Strait to Seyyedeh village, the last village covered by this mountain. The eastern part of Gabast is based on the nearby mountain of Nakh, which houses the villages of the Koukherd region. Gabast is a green mountain, and a great variety of plant species grows naturally, especially turpentine and myrtle. It must be added that the highest point of the province of Hormozgan is in the heights of Gabast. Located in such a mountainous region and near the Persian Gulf, Bastak enjoys a special and mild climate, with an average annual temperature of around 27 degrees.

Some rivers flow in the region of Bastak. Among others, Mehran, Godeh and Roud-e shour. Mehran originates in the heights of Lorestan in the province of Fars and flows into the Persian Gulf, while the river Goudeh rises in the mountains of Faryab southeast of Bastak and empties into the Persian Gulf reaching the Khamir Harbor (Bandar-e Khamir). This river is the habitat of a species of fish that locals name karou. The streams of the region are naturally salty and unusable for agriculture. However, their beauty, the fauna and flora that they shelter make them tourist attractions for the region.
Formerly, Bastak was the important center of the former province of Jahangirieh, as specified in a sixteenth century geographic treaty, but the region has gradually lost its place and fame. The many caravanserais of this region, in addition to those of the city itself and dating among others Safavid times (1501-1739) and qaJare, illustrate this story. It is in particular in the study of Safavid caravanserais and their history that it is possible to trace the history of this city, which has been in the course of the history devoted to maritime but also terrestrial trade.

According to a current opinion, the name of Bastak comes from the word "Basteh" which means "closed": the geographical location of the city surrounded by mountains on all sides would explain this name. As for the villages surrounding Bastak, some date from the ancient era, as Pata, Koukherd and Harang, which have retained their pre-Islamic names. The village of Pata (meaning the place of radiation of the sun) whose history dates back to the Sassanid period (205-651), is currently an archaeological site where we can visit the remains of a fortress, an academy and an ancient cemetery.

Bastak and its region are blessed with a number of historical and natural attractions that attract many Iranian and foreign travelers every year. The beauties of the Gabast Mountains, the fortress of Jenah, the market of Bastak and the mosque Jameh are examples. The Jameh Mosque, one of the first religious buildings in Bastak, was built during the Safavid era on the orders of Governor Sheikh Mohammad Bastaki. The building of this mosque is remarkable for its dome and two minarets 33 meters high. Another of the city's historic buildings to visit is Bastak's well-preserved caravanserai, which is located in the city center. It formerly served the commercial road sea-land Bandar-Abbas-Lar. This caravanserai includes a large central courtyard surrounded on all four sides by the buildings of the complex. Two wings of the caravanserai shelter the galleries where the stables were, and the other two wings include the rooms of the travelers.

Finally, note that the geographical and historical location of Bastak offers him the opportunity to regain some importance, especially in the tourist field.